Nigeria is 95th happiest nation, according to World Happiness Report

Abuja, March 20, 2017 (TNE): Nigeria has been ranked the 95th happiest nation of the world and sixth in Africa in the 2017 World Happiness Report which ranked 155 countries by their happiness levels.

The report was released on Monday by the Sustainable Development Solutions Network (SDSN) as part of the UN World Happiness Day on March 20.

According the report, Nigeria advanced from 103 position in the world and maintained its stand as the sixth happiest country in Africa as indicated by 2016 happiness ranking.

Nigeria’s position shows that in spite of its current economic recession and security challenges, its citizens remain happy.

Algeria maintained its lead as the happiest country in Africa, followed by Mauritius, while crisis-torn Libya is surprisingly ranked third ahead of Morocco.

The report also indicates that Somalia, another crisis-torn nation, is Africa’s fifth happiest country ahead of Nigeria and South Africa which ranks seventh.

Tunisia is placed at number eight; Egypt stands at nine and Sierra Leone in the 10th position.

At the bottom 10 are Republic of Benin, Madagascar, South Sudan, Liberia, Guinea, Togo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Burundi and the most unhappy, Central African Republic.

On the global stage, Norway has trumped Denmark as the world’s happiest country in a report that calls on nations to build social trust and equality to improve wellbeing.

Denmark, Iceland, Switzerland, Finland, the Netherlands, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Sweden round out the top 10 countries.

Germany was ranked 16th, the U.K. 19th and France 31st while U.S. dropped one spot to 14th.

According to the report, countries in sub-Saharan Africa, along with Syria and Yemen are the least happy.

South Sudan, Liberia, Guinea, Togo, Rwanda, Tanzania, Burundi and Central African Republic were at the bottom.

The World Happiness Report, an initiative of the UN, is a landmark survey of the state of global happiness, aimed at influencing government policy.

The report reviews the state of happiness in the world and shows how the new science of happiness explains personal and national variations in happiness.

It reflects a new worldwide demand for more attention to happiness as criteria for government policy.

The rankings are based on six factors — per capita gross domestic product, healthy life expectancy, freedom, generosity, social support and absence of corruption in government or business.

The lowest countries are typically marked by low values in all six variables. (TNE)

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